He who buys ‘Success’, reads and digests its precepts, will find this inspiring volume a sure will-tonic. It will nerve him to be up and doing. It will put such spring and go into him that he will make a determined start on that road which, pursued with perseverance, leads onwards and upwards to the desired goal–SUCCESS.

Success–that is the royal road we all want to tread, for the echo off its flagstones sounds pleasantly in the mind.

It gives to man all that the natural man desires: the opportunity of exercising his activities to the full; the sense of power; the feeling that life is a slave, not a master; the knowledge that some great industry has quickened into life under the impulse of a single brain. What are the qualities which make for success?

They are three:

Judgment, Industry, and Health, and perhaps the greatest of these is judgment.

These are the three pillars which hold up the fabric of success. But in using the word judgment one has said everything.

First published in 1912, Success was written by William Maxwell “Max” Aitken, first Baron Beaverbrook, PC who was a Canadian – British business tycoon and politician. His visits to the Western Front during World War I, during which he held the honorary rank of colonel in the Canadian Army, resulted in his 1916 book Canada in Flanders, a three-volume collection that chronicled the achievements of Canadian soldiers on the battlefields.

After the War, he wrote several books including Politicians and the Press in 1925 and Politicians and the War in 1928.

Table of Contents

  • PUBLISHERS’ NOTE5
  • PREFACE6
  • I SUCCESS8
  • II HAPPINESS: THREE SECRETS13
  • III LUCK18
  • IV MODERATION24
  • V MONEY30
  • VI EDUCATION35
  • VII ARROGANCE40
  • VIII COURAGE44
  • IX PANIC48
  • X DEPRESSION52
  • XI FAILURE56
  • XII CONSISTENCY61
  • XIII PREJUDICE65
  • XIV CALM69

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